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jenslarsenjazz

**Content:** [00:00](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TSXJe7YkI_k&t=0s) Intro [00:31](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TSXJe7YkI_k&t=31s) #1 Learning by ear [02:07](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TSXJe7YkI_k&t=127s) #2 Evaluate Your Own Playing And Progress [03:47](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TSXJe7YkI_k&t=227s) #3 Fretboard knowledge [04:16](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TSXJe7YkI_k&t=256s) #4 Knowing Music Theory [05:03](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TSXJe7YkI_k&t=303s) #5 Reading Music [06:48](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TSXJe7YkI_k&t=408s) #6 Setting Up A Guitar [08:02](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TSXJe7YkI_k&t=482s) #7 Playing With Other People [09:51](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TSXJe7YkI_k&t=591s) The 5 Solos That Will Teach You Jazz Guitar [09:59](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TSXJe7YkI_k&t=599s) Like the video? Check out my Patreon page!


FalcosLiteralyHitler

All of these are important, but to emphasize one of them: If you want to make guaranteed money playing the guitar - **learn to read music and learn music theory.** There is a *ton* of freelance work out there that is paying. I work professionally as a guitarist, and I'm no shred master or anything. But I get a lot of work, and good paying work, *because y'all fucks don't spend the time to learn to read and from the perspective of other musicians it can be a nightmare to work with you.* Learn to read my guys. The music theory aspect is just important because it's a universal language we can all speak as musicians. It makes communication easier. Nothing is more frustrating than working with a singer or other instrumentalist that has ideas or changes but has no way to communicate those changes to you other than "hey at this part here can you kinda do this sort of thing?"


Analog_2_Digital

What tools do you use to find freelance work? Is it an app or website or do you just get referred by people you already know? I currently work as an Electrical Engineer in something totally unrelated, but would love to try something like this on the side.


FalcosLiteralyHitler

Now that I've been in the scene a while it's referrals from people I already know. However when you first start, I'd look into FB groups. I'm in CT and there's one that's just a call for Pit and Orchestra musicians. They are usually low paying but it will tend to snowball from there and once people know who you are and know you play well and are reliable and not an asshole, you will start to get random FB messages or emails asking you to do shows, and asking you to play better and better gigs. If there is no FB group, you can always just go to a theater in the area and try to chat up the pit after and let the guitar player or MD (conductor) know you are interested and want to get into the scene. Like I said, there's a serious lack of guitar players that can read/are willing to learn, so there's lots of work available. I'm sure they'd be glad to have your name, even if you are somewhere down the call list. Sometimes there's an emergency and no guitar player available so they will take what they can get.


Analog_2_Digital

Cool thanks for the tip!


Behemot66

All these skills are important for any style. PS. Jens do you have any video on Joe Pass' fingerstyle technique? I started on classical so playing with fingers is always more natural than with pick. I can get better phrasing with less effort. But speed is limited that way. Any pointers?


jenslarsenjazz

No, I don't have that. I did a video on Patreon on the topic, but it is something that I have never studied in a systematic way so I don't really feel I can teach it, similar to how I don't teach Wes' technique when I don't play like that.


Charts_Graphs

Prioritize keeping time and staying in the pocket over everything else. Way too much emphasis on solo wanking, stunt-riffs, or progressing ahead of your developed competency. Mistake. Timing is everything in music and life.


Andjhostet

What's the most important part of a joke timing


ironwalrus22

At first this really upset me but then I got it lol


Andjhostet

It's a hard joke to properly express over text. It works better when saying it out loud haha.


gynoceros

You did just fine by not using any punctuation.


jenslarsenjazz

Certainly :)


Charts_Graphs

To be clear, I was speaking generally about too much emphasis on wanking, stunt runs, etc, not specifically about your vid which was quite good. Just saying that in general, people prioritize that stuff too much and ignore keeping time, which is like a painter focusing exclusively on color palette without learning how to use a brush.


SPPANK666

Starting guitar in the 80’s was the best ear training. You would hear a new song and figure it out by ear. If it was popular enough you would later find it transcribed in one of the guitar magazine. Sometimes months or a year after the song was released. It gave you the opportunity to try to figure it out t out. But you still had these resources to see if you got it right. I remember I had this Led Zeppelin song book and the only song with tab was stairway to heaven. I tried to play rain song with standard tuning chord found in that book and I thought Jimmy page must have had super powers. Later when I found it transcribed in Guitar Player magazine I found out it was an open tuning. Now a days you just go to ultimate guitar. I listen to lots of obscure music, so not so much available there for me.


YossarianJr

This sounds ideal....if your ear were good enough that you wouldn't give up immediately. I'll bet that there's a way higher proportion of today's kids who play than there were in the 80s because they have so many resources at their disposal. I'll also guess that most of these kids are less good than they would've been one year in than they would've been in the 80s.


lydian_augmented

jens spitting true facts as always!


jenslarsenjazz

Thanks!


squalorfarts

Great video. Thanks. This has inspired me to practice jazz for the next few months/years. I feel if you can get jazz down, it makes other styles more intuitive to learn and able to put more "spice" on those styles.


jenslarsenjazz

Glad you like it! :) Go for it!


XFrozenGrapesX

Good stuff


jenslarsenjazz

Thanks! :)


StatusMassive6348

You’re videos are a godsend- such a great service to the community


jenslarsenjazz

Thank you! I am glad you find them useful!


Itsaghast

I don't quite understand how sheet music identifies notes out of the key. If it because the flats in the notation are basically "lower this diatonic note by a half step" ? Which of course the number doesn't tell you that it's not just another note in the scale.


jenslarsenjazz

Yes, essentially that is the very rough way of looking at it. It actually goes further in terms of being able to hear things in key as well.


MrSloppyPants

The key signature tells you which notes should always be played sharp or flat when notated as standard. If you are in the key of G, and you see an F notated, you would play it as an F#. If you were supposed to actually play an F, it would be notated as an F Natural. Typically whenever you see accidentals in sheet music they are indicating notes that are out of key.


pokemonbard

Sheet music doesn’t tell you explicitly which notes are in or out of key, it just tells you what notes to play. It’s up to the reader to determine the key of a passage and therefore the function of the written notes. You can roughly tell which notes are non-diatonic by looking at the accidentals, but that’s not a universal answer. There are times in which a piece will temporarily modulate to another key without actually changing key signatures, using accidentals to tell you to play notes that are diatonic to the temporary key. There is sheet music that doesn’t include a key signature at all, using only accidentals; most often, this is used for atonal or neotonal works with less emphasis on diatonicity, but some modern composers who want to change keys frequently just don’t like using key signatures. Ultimately, you have to look at the overall context of a given note to know whether it’s diatonic or not. There are some shortcuts, like looking for accidentals, but nothing can replace awareness and application of music theory.


jenslarsenjazz

That is true, though I feel that for tonal music, people really underestimate how powerful it actually is for ear training and theory. And even with all that then it is a better description of the sound than a bunch of numbers.


pokemonbard

Oh, absolutely. I have classical training, and I can’t imagine any other way. Tablature has value, but it just doesn’t tell you that much about the actual music being played.


rowandeg

Top video. Love the editing as well.


jenslarsenjazz

Thank you! :)


YossarianJr

Just give me some quick wins, too, eh??